America’s Opioid Epidemic: The Public Health Implications of Our Unsecure Borders

Border Fence and Border Patrol in Nogales, ArizonaBorder security is a necessity for any sovereign nation. However, examining the why before the how is usually best. Answers, such as “impenetrable, physical walls” and a “special deportation task force”, are easy to toss around for instantaneous ovations, but difficult to implement in the heat and uncertainty of the desert and the emotional tolls of separating families. In order to develop lasting solutions, analyzing key areas leading to border instability are crucial.

America’s demand for drugs is a major factor in border instability. In a recent Majority Staff Report of the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs titled “America’s Insatiable Demand for Drugs: The Public Health and Safety Implications for Our Unsecure Border”, Senator Ron Johnson addressed several key areas pertaining to America’s drug epidemic. Highlights of the report include:

  • “Committee hearings on America’s demand for drugs including four field hearings across the country”
  • “Effects of drugs on the U.S. national and border security”
  • “Public approaches to curb illicit drug abuse and addiction”
  • “Examination of the current opioid epidemic in the United States”

In seeking solutions to the why, the how can have a longer impact. By taking shortcuts and implementing policies that address short-term goals, we delay actual change. At the Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL), we daily add reports, publications, and materials to address the whys of border policy. By observing our Border Security Featured Topic, you can understand current approaches, facts, figures, and threats. However, HSDL has a broad assortment of resources concerning drugs, corruption, and inner city decay which are just as important as checkpoints. (some material may require HSDL login)