Nov, 2021
Crime Against Persons with Disabilities, 2009-2019 - Statistical Tables
United States. Bureau of Justice Statistics
Harrell, Erika, 1976-
From the Document: "In 2019, the rate of violent victimization against persons with disabilities was nearly four times the rate for persons without disabilities (49.2 compared to 12.4 per 1,000 age 12 or older). Since July 2016, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has asked all respondents their disability status, allowing rates by disability status to be generated solely from NCVS data. [...] Prior to this, American Community Survey (ACS) population data were used to calculate the rate of violent victimization against persons with disabilities, which was at least twice the rate for persons without disabilities every year from 2009 to 2019. [...] This report provides rates of nonfatal violent victimization against persons with and without disabilities, describes types of disabilities, and details victim characteristics. Nonfatal violent crimes include rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault. Findings are based on BJS's [Bureau of Justice Statistics] NCVS, a household survey that collects data on residents of the United States age 12 or older (excluding those living in institutions)."
    Details
  • URL
  • Author
    Harrell, Erika, 1976-
  • Publisher
    United States. Bureau of Justice Statistics
  • Report Number
    NCJ 301367; National Criminal Justice 301367
  • Date
    Nov, 2021
  • Copyright
    Public Domain
  • Retrieved From
    Bureau of Justice Statistics: www.bjs.gov/
  • Format
    pdf
  • Media Type
    application/pdf
  • Subjects
    People with disabilities
    Violence
  • Resource Group
    Data and statistics

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