20 Jul, 2021
Study to Identify Methods to Assess Equity: Report to the President
United States. Executive Office of the President
From the Document: "The Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) shall, in partnership with the heads of agencies, study methods for assessing whether agency policies and actions create or exacerbate barriers to full and equal participation by all eligible individuals. The study should aim to identify the best methods, consistent with applicable law, to assist agencies in assessing equity with respect to race, ethnicity, religion, income, geography, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability. As part of this study, the Director of OMB shall consider whether to recommend that agencies employ pilot programs to test model assessment tools and assist agencies in doing so. Within 6 months of the date of this order, the Director of OMB shall deliver a report to the President describing the best practices identified by the study and, as appropriate, recommending approaches to expand use of those methods across the Federal Government."

Citing HSDL Resources

Documents from the HSDL collection cannot automatically be added to citation managers (e.g. Refworks, Endnotes, etc). This HSDL abstract page contains some of the pieces you may need when citing a resource, such as the author, publisher and date information. We highly recommend you always refer to the resource itself as the most accurate source of information when citing. Here are some sources that can help with formatting citations (particularly for government documents).

Worldcat: http://www.worldcat.org/

Indiana University Guide: Citing U.S. Government Publications: http://libraries.iub.edu/guide-citing-us-government-publications
Clear examples for citing specific types of government publications in a variety of formats. It does not address citing according to specific style guides.

Naval Postgraduate School: Dudley Knox Library. Citing Styles: http://libguides.nps.edu/citation
Specific examples for citing government publications according to APA and Chicago style guides. Click on the link for your preferred style then navigate to the specific type of government publication.

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