9 Apr, 2021
Annual Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community [April 9, 2021]
United States. Office of the Director of National Intelligence
From the Foreword: "In the coming year, the United States and its allies will face a diverse array of threats that are playing out amidst the global disruption resulting from the COVID-19 [coronavirus disease 2019] pandemic and against the backdrop of great power competition, the disruptive effects of ecological degradation and a changing climate, an increasing number of empowered non-state actors, and rapidly evolving technology. The complexity of the threats, their intersections, and the potential for cascading events in an increasingly interconnected and mobile world create new challenges for the IC [intelligence community]. Ecological and climate changes, for example, are connected to public health risks, humanitarian concerns, social and political instability, and geopolitical rivalry. The 2021 Annual Threat Assessment highlights some of those connections as it provides the IC's baseline assessments of the most pressing threats to US national interests, while emphasizing the United States' key adversaries and competitors. It is not an exhaustive assessment of all global challenges and notably excludes assessments of US adversaries' vulnerabilities. It accounts for functional concerns, such as weapons of mass destruction and technology, primarily in the sections on threat actors, such as China and Russia."
    Details
  • URL
  • Publisher
    United States. Office of the Director of National Intelligence
  • Date
    9 Apr, 2021
  • Copyright
    Public Domain
  • Retrieved From
    Office of the Director of National Intelligence: www.dni.gov/
  • Format
    pdf
  • Media Type
    application/pdf
  • Subjects
    Threats
    Intelligence
    Intelligence service
  • Resource Group
    Critical Releases
  • Series
    Annual Threat Assessment

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