30 Jul, 2015
Mass Murder with Firearms: Incidents and Victims, 1999-2013 [July 30, 2015]
Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
Krouse, William J.; Richardson, Daniel J.
"In the wake of tragedy in Newtown, CT, Congress defined 'mass killings' as '3 or more killings in a single incident' (P.L. 112-265). Any consideration of new or existing gun laws that follows mass shootings is likely to generate requests for comprehensive data on the prevalence and deadliness of these incidents. […] According to the FBI, the term 'mass murder' has been defined generally as a multiple homicide incident in which four or more victims are murdered, within one event, and in one or more locations in close geographical proximity. Based on this definition, for the purposes of this report, 'mass shooting' is defined as a multiple homicide incident in which four or more victims are murdered with firearms, within one event, and in one or more locations in close proximity. Similarly, a 'mass public shooting' is defined to mean a multiple homicide incident in which four or more victims are murdered with firearms, within one event, in at least one or more public locations, such as a workplace, school, restaurant, house of worship, neighborhood, or other public setting. This report analyzes mass shootings for a 15-year period (1999-2013). CRS analysis of the FBI SHR dataset and other research indicates that offenders committed at least 317 mass shootings, murdered 1,554 victims, and non-fatally wounded another 441 victims entirely with firearms during that 15-year period. The prevalence of mass shooting incidents and victim counts fluctuated sporadically from year to year. For the period 2007-2013, the annual averages for both incidents and victim counts were slightly higher than the years from 1999-2007."
    Details
  • URL
  • Authors
    Krouse, William J.
    Richardson, Daniel J.
  • Publisher
    Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
  • Report Number
    CRS Report for Congress, R44126
  • Date
    30 Jul, 2015
  • Copyright
    Public Domain
  • Retrieved From
    Via E-mail
  • Format
    pdf
  • Media Type
    application/pdf
  • Subjects
    Law and justice/Law enforcement
    Weapons and weapon systems/Conventional weapons
  • Resource Group
    Reports (CRS)

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