27 Apr, 2009
Section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2006: A Fact Sheet on Department of Defense Authority to Train and Equip Foreign Military Forces [April 27, 2009]
Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
Serafino, Nina M.
"Section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2006 provides the Secretary of Defense with authority to train and equip foreign military and foreign maritime security forces. DOD values this authority as an important tool to train and equip military partners. Funds may be obligated only with the concurrence of the Secretary of State. Thus far, the Department of Defense (DOD) has used Section 1206 authority primarily to provide counterterrorism support. This authority expires in FY2011. Section 1206 obligations totaled some $100 million in FY2006, $279 million in FY2007, and $293 million in FY2008. As of mid-April 2009, FY2009 project approvals are being finalized. As of the date of this report, of FY2009 funds, only $49.3 million has been approved and obligated for two programs in Lebanon."
    Details
  • URL
  • Author
    Serafino, Nina M.
  • Publisher
    Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
  • Report Number
    CRS Report for Congress, RS22855
  • Date
    27 Apr, 2009
  • Copyright
    Public Domain
  • Retrieved From
    Via E-mail
  • Format
    pdf
  • Media Type
    application/pdf
  • Subjects
    Military
    Military assistance, American
    United States. Department of Defense
    National Defense Authorization Act
    Expenditures, Public
  • Resource Group
    Reports (CRS)
  • Series
    CRS Report for Congress, RS22855

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