National Security and Immigration Policy: Reclaiming Terms, Measuring Success, and Setting Priorities
Combating Terrorism Center (U.S.)
Stock, Margaret, 1929-; Kerwin, Donald, 1961-
"The U.S. debate on immigration has been characterized by a simplistic 'human rights versus national security' paradigm that has inhibited serious discussion of the role of the U.S. immigration system in a coordinated national security strategy. The debate has been further hampered by the paucity of counter-terror experts who understand the immigration system, and by a lack of security expertise in the immigrant rights community. This project attempts to bridge that divide. The stakes could not be higher. The threat of catastrophic terrorism, coupled with the vulnerabilities exposed by the September 11th attacks, demands that the U.S. immigration system be integrated into a comprehensive national security plan. At the same time, U.S. strength and prosperity- a key component of US national security- depends on America's openness to the foreign-born and, even more, on America's adherence to its defining values."

Citing HSDL Resources

Documents from the HSDL collection cannot automatically be added to citation managers (e.g. Refworks, Endnotes, etc). This HSDL abstract page contains some of the pieces you may need when citing a resource, such as the author, publisher and date information. We highly recommend you always refer to the resource itself as the most accurate source of information when citing. Here are some sources that can help with formatting citations (particularly for government documents).

Worldcat: http://www.worldcat.org/

Indiana University Guide: Citing U.S. Government Publications: http://libraries.iub.edu/guide-citing-us-government-publications
Clear examples for citing specific types of government publications in a variety of formats. It does not address citing according to specific style guides.

Naval Postgraduate School: Dudley Knox Library. Citing Styles: http://libguides.nps.edu/citation
Specific examples for citing government publications according to APA and Chicago style guides. Click on the link for your preferred style then navigate to the specific type of government publication.

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