2004
Human Trafficking Fact Sheet
United States. Department of Health and Human Services
"Human trafficking is a modern-day form of slavery. Victims of human trafficking are subjected to force, fraud, or coercion, for the purpose of sexual exploitation or forced labor. Victims are young children, teenagers, men and women. After drug dealing, human trafficking is tied with the illegal arms industry as the second largest criminal industry in the world today, and it is the fastest growing. The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) defines 'Severe Forms of Trafficking in Persons' as: 1) Sex Trafficking: the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act, in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person forced to perform such an act is under the age of 18 years; or 2) Labor Trafficking: the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage or slavery."
    Details
  • URL
  • Publisher
    United States. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Date
    2004
  • Copyright
    Public Domain
  • Retrieved From
    Department of Health and Human Services: www.hhs.gov/
  • Format
    pdf
  • Media Type
    application/pdf

Citing HSDL Resources

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Worldcat: http://www.worldcat.org/

Indiana University Guide: Citing U.S. Government Publications: http://libraries.iub.edu/guide-citing-us-government-publications
Clear examples for citing specific types of government publications in a variety of formats. It does not address citing according to specific style guides.

Naval Postgraduate School: Dudley Knox Library. Citing Styles: http://libguides.nps.edu/citation
Specific examples for citing government publications according to APA and Chicago style guides. Click on the link for your preferred style then navigate to the specific type of government publication.

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