ABSTRACT

Silenced: How Forced Arbitration Keeps Victims of Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in the Shadows, Hearing Before the Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventeenth Congress, First Session, Tuesday, November 16, 2021   [open pdf - 50MB]

This is the November 16, 2021 hearing on "Silenced: How Forced Arbitration Keeps Victims of Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in the Shadows," held before the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary. From the opening statement of Jerrold Nadler: "Arbitration was originally developed as an alternative to the court system for parties of relatively equal bargaining power to enter voluntarily. In recent decades, however, forced arbitration, which lacks many of the fundamental due process and transparency safeguards present in the courts, has worked its way into nearly every aspect of our lives, largely in the form of ''take it or leave it'' contracts between very large companies and individual consumers. The sum total of this trend is that forced arbitration clauses have rendered our court system inaccessible to far too many. Nowhere is that trend more apparent or problematic than in the workplace." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Eliza Dushku, Tatiana Spottiswoode, Anna St. John, Andowah Newton, Sarah Parshall Perry, Lora Henry, and Myriam Gilles.

Report Number:
Serial No. 117-46
Publisher:
Date:
2022
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U. S. Government Publishing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
Help with citations