ABSTRACT

Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform, Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security of the House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary, One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, First Session, July 10, 2019   [open pdf - 9MB]

This is the July 10, 2019 hearing on "Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform," held before the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security of the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary. From the opening statement of Karen Bass: "In 2017, there were over 600,000 marijuana-related arrests reported in the United States. Of these almost 600,000 were arrests for marijuana possession in 1 year. Indeed, hundreds of thousands of people, the majority of whom are black and Latino, have had their lives impacted by arrests and convictions for marijuana offenses. Since the time President Nixon declared a war on drugs in the early 1970s, the effect of this war on black and Latino communities has been severely disproportionate. The war on drugs was racially biased from its inception, and it has been carried out in a discriminatory fashion with disastrous consequences for hundreds of thousands of people of color and their communities. [...] There is a growing consensus in this country that current marijuana laws are not appropriate, and we must consider reform. Today's hearing is a first step in that process." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Marilyn Mosby, David L. Nathan, Neal Levine, and G. Malik Burnett.

Report Number:
Serial No. 116-33
Publisher:
Date:
2021
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Government Publishing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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