ABSTRACT

Compensation Programs for COVID-19 Vaccine Injuries [December 9, 2021]   [open pdf - 1MB]

From the Summary: "More than 200 million Americans, and billions of people worldwide, have received one or more doses of a vaccine to protect against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Most common side effects to COVID-19 vaccines are mild and generally resolve in a few days. However, in rare instances, COVID-19 vaccines can cause serious adverse events. For example, roughly one person out of every 200,000 who receives an mRNA [messenger ribonucleic acid]-based COVID-19 vaccine experiences a severe allergic reaction. Other reported serious adverse events, such as myocarditis and Guillain-Barré Syndrome, are rare but may be associated with some COVID-19 vaccines. Individuals who believe they are injured by COVID-19 vaccines may seek compensation for those injuries and other associated harms or costs. Absent an applicable federal law, individuals allegedly injured by a vaccine might seek redress by filing a state tort law claim against the vaccine manufacturer. However, federal law has two distinct compensation regimes that limit legal liability for vaccine manufacturers and provide potential compensation--without requiring a showing of fault--for individuals harmed by adverse reactions to vaccines. For injuries and deaths associated with most vaccines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for routine administration in the United States (such as pediatric and seasonal influenza vaccines), the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) may provide compensation. During public health emergencies declared under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act), the Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program (CICP) may provide compensation for injuries and deaths resulting from the administration of 'covered countermeasures,' which may include vaccines."

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, R46982
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2021-12-09
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Congressional Research Service: https://crsreports.congress.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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