ABSTRACT

How COVID-19 is Changing the World: A Statistical Perspective, Volume III   [open pdf - 11MB]

From the Introduction: "We are pleased to present the third volume of 'How COVID-19 [coronavirus disease 2019] is changing the world: a statistical perspective'. Since the release of the first volume in May 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has continued to rage around the world. By mid-March, 2021, countries around the globe had reported over 123 million cases--a nearly five-fold increase since this report's previous volume--and over 2.7 million deaths attributed to the disease. And while new case loads are currently on the rise again, the global health community has already administered almost 400 million doses of vaccines, at last offering some signs of hope and progress. Nonetheless, the pandemic continues to present daunting challenges for governments and international organizations. Economic impacts threaten to undo decades of recent progress in poverty reduction, child nutrition and gender equality, and exacerbate efforts to support refugees, migrants, and other vulnerable communities. National and local governments--together with international and private-sector partners--must deploy vaccines as efficiently, safely and equitably as possible while still monitoring for new outbreaks and continuing policies to protect those who do not yet have immunity. Economic recovery efforts are also increasingly urgent as the world begins to pivot to a 'post-pandemic' reality. It is becoming increasingly clear that choices made over the next months and years could have impacts for generations to come."

Publisher:
Date:
2021
Series:
Copyright:
2021 Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities. Posted here with permission. Document is under a Creative Commons license and requires proper attribution and noncommercial use to be shared: [https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/]
Retrieved From:
United Nations Statistics Division: https://unstats.un.org/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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