ABSTRACT

'Regular Order': A Perspective [November 6, 2020]   [open pdf - 2MB]

From the Summary: "Many contemporary lawmakers urge a return to 'regular order' lawmaking. In general, the regular order refers to a traditional, committee-centered process of lawmaking, very much in evidence during most of the 20th century. Today, Congress has evolved to become largely a party-centered institution. Committees remain important, but they are less important than previously as 'gatekeepers' to the floor. This development represents a fundamental 'then and now' change in the power dynamics of Capitol Hill. Regular order is generally viewed as a systematic, step-by-step lawmaking process that emphasizes the role of committees: bill introduction and referral to committee; the conduct of committee hearings, markups, and reports on legislation; House and Senate floor consideration of committee-reported measures; and the creation of conference committees to resolve bicameral differences."

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, R46597
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2020-11-06
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Congressional Research Service: https://crsreports.congress.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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