ABSTRACT

Paleoliquefaction Field Reconnaissance in Eastern North Carolina -- Is There Evidence for Large Magnitude Earthquakes Between the Central Virginia Seismic Zone and Charleston Seismic Zone?   [open pdf - 18MB]

From the Abstract: "In June 2016, approximately 64 kilometers (km) of riverbank were examined along the Tar and Neuse Rivers near Tarboro and Kinston, North Carolina, for evidence of liquefaction-forming earthquakes. The study area is in the vicinity of the Grainger's fault zone in eastern North Carolina. The Grainger's fault zone is a fault zone in the inner Coastal Plain Province that has well-documented Paleogene and younger deformation of Cretaceous to Eocene strata. Low-magnitude earthquakes near the fault zone (for example, magnitude [M] 2.1 in 2013, 13 km south-southwest of Kinston) suggest larger earthquakes may have struck this region in the past. The study area is about equidistant from newly documented Holocene paleoliquefaction sites in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone (CVSZ) and liquefaction sites formed during the 1886 M7.1 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake. The northernmost Holocene paleoliquefaction features associated with the Charleston Seismic Zone (CSZ) are in Southport, North Carolina."

Report Number:
Scientific Investigations Report 2019-5057
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2019
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Geological Survey: https://www.usgs.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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