ABSTRACT

Sudan [Updated August 21, 2019]   [open pdf - 518KB]

From the Document: "On April 11, 2019, Sudan's military removed President Omar al Bashir from office after three decades in power. Four months of near-daily protests across the country had shaken the government, and in early April, huge crowds gathered in front of the military's headquarters in Khartoum to demand regime change. The protests, triggered by austerity measures amid an economic crisis, were fueled by a range of grievances against the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) and Bashir, who took power in a 1989 coup. [...] Sudan's military has a long history of intervention in politics (Bashir's 1989 coup was the country's fourth). Military leaders played prominent roles in Bashir's regime, and the extent to which the TMC [Transitional Military Council] represents a break from the NCP is debated. The African Union (AU) declared Bashir's overthrow to be another coup d'état and, after the June 3 violence, suspended Sudan from the organization."

Report Number:
CRS In Focus, IF10182
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2019-08-21
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Congressional Research Service: https://crsreports.congress.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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