ABSTRACT

H.A.S.C. No. 115-28; Serial No. 115-12: Threats to Space Assets and Implications for Homeland Security, Joint Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces of the Committee on Armed Services Meeting Jointly with Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, First Session, Hearing Held March 29, 2017   [open pdf - 3MB]

This is the March 29, 2017 hearing on "Threats to Space Assets and Implications for Homeland Security," held jointly before the House of Representatives Subcommittee on Strategic Forces of the Committee on Armed Services and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications of the Committee on Homeland Security. From the opening statement of Mike Rogers: "Unfortunately, talking about a conflict extending to space isn't science fiction anymore and the impact of that threat extends beyond the military. It extends to our way of life here in the United States. There likely isn't a person in this hearing room, nor within the entire Capitol campus that hasn't utilized the services provided by satellites at some point today. For instance, aside from DIRECTV and DISH satellite TV, which allow me to watch Alabama play football on Saturdays no matter where I am-Roll Tide-the Global Positioning System, or GPS, is probably the most widely known space asset and for good reason. While I think many recognize that GPS powers their navigation in their cars and cellphones, they may not know or may not recognize the support it provides to financial transactions, farming, shipping, public safety, environmental monitoring, and a host of other areas. The American public may also not realize that GPS is built and operated [by] the United States Air Force. Potential adversaries recognize our dependence on it. I guarantee you that. And GPS is one of many important space systems. We spend time in the Armed Services Committee understanding what the loss of space would mean to the military and that we need to protect and defend those assets. But what does a loss of space mean to our economy and our financial institutions, our agricultural activities, our transportation and infrastructure?" Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Thad W. Allen, Joseph Nimmich, and William L. Shelton.

Report Number:
H.A.S.C. No. 115-28; House Armed Services Committee No. 115-28; S. Hrg. 115-12, Pt. 4; Senate Hearing 115-12
Publisher:
Date:
2017
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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