ABSTRACT

Emergency Management in Indian Country: Improving FEMA's Federal-Tribal Relationship with Indian Tribes, Hearing Before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, First Session, February 8, 2017   [open pdf - 601KB]

This is the February 8, 2017 hearing on "Emergency Management in Indian Country: Improving FEMA's Federal-Tribal Relationship with Indian Tribes," held before the Committee on Indian Affairs. From the opening statement of John Hoeven: "The Committee is holding this important hearing on emergency management in Indian country. It is timely to begin this conversation now. The winters can be hazardous in many parts of the country. With the spring comes the thaw and often flooding. My home State of North Dakota is a good example. In other parts of the country, oftentimes it is tornadoes or battling fires. Some Indian reservations in North Dakota, most notably the Spirit Lake Indian Reservation and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, have received major disaster declarations due to spring flooding. Tribes around the country experience other types of emergencies and disasters. These hard hit communities face a long road to recovery. It is incumbent upon the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, to effectively assist in that recovery and to get an early start on efforts to reduce the impacts of future disaster risks." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Alex Amparo, Russell Begaye, Michael Chavrria, and Cody Desautel.

Report Number:
S. Hrg. 115-47; Senate Hearing 115-47
Publisher:
Date:
2017
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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