ABSTRACT

Examining the Consequences of Executive Branch Overreach of the Antiquities Act, Oversight Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Federal Lands of the Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, First Session, May 2, 2017   [open pdf - 351KB]

This is the May 2, 2017 hearing on "Examining the Consequences of Executive Branch Overreach of the Antiquities Act," held before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Federal Lands of the Committee on Natural Resources. From the opening statement of Tom McClintock: "The Antiquities Act provides the President the authority to designate national monuments on Federal land containing 'historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest.' The law also specified that national monuments 'be confined to the smallest area compatible with proper care and management of the objects to be protected.' Furthermore, the President could only designate national monuments 'upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States.' The purpose of the Act was to give presidents the ability to quickly protect archeological sites from looting. [...] Today, the Subcommittee will hear testimony surrounding the designation of millions of acres under an authority that limits them to the smallest area compatible with proper care and management of the objects to be protected." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Kathleen Clarke, Paul LePage, Knox Marshall, and Lucas St. Clair.

Report Number:
Serial Number 115-5; Serial No. 115-5
Publisher:
Date:
2017
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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