ABSTRACT

Department of Defense Security Cooperation and Assistance Programs and Authorities, Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats of the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, Second Session, March 9, 2016   [open pdf - 5MB]

This is from the March 9, 2016 hearing, "Department of Defense Security Cooperation and Assistance Programs and Authorities," before the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats of the Committee on Armed Services. From the statement of Michael J. McNerney: "The RAND Corporation has analyzed the costs and benefits of security cooperation extensively over the past 15 years. I've analyzed security cooperation challenges during that same period, both at the Pentagon and at RAND. Make no mistake: Working with foreign militaries is more art than science. But it certainly shouldn't be abstract art. Security cooperation is most effective when it's based on coordinated planning and informed by rigorous analysis. But ultimately, it must be tailored by the dedicated men and women serving overseas to meet the realities they face on the ground. Clear guidance and intensive training are crucial to ensure that they can overcome the many challenges that arise in this line of work. Today, I will focus on three questions. First, how does the Department of Defense (DoD) prioritize its security cooperation investments? Second, how does DoD manage the current patchwork of relevant legislative authorities that have been pieced together in recent years? Third, how can DoD and Congress better evaluate the effectiveness of these activities?" Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Jeffrey W. Eggers, Melissa G. Dalton, and Michael J. McNerney.

Report Number:
S. Hrg. 114-655; Senate Hearing 114-655
Publisher:
Date:
2017
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Publishing Office: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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