ABSTRACT

Serial No. 114-64: Accountability and Transformation: Tier Rankings in the Fight Against Human Trafficking, Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, First Session, April 22, 2015   [open pdf - 6MB]

This is the April 22, 2015 hearing "Accountability and Transformation: Tier Rankings in the Fight Against Human Trafficking," held before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. From the opening statement of subcommittee Chairman Christopher H. Smith: "The success of the TIP [Trafficking in Persons] Report and rankings is beyond anything we could have hoped for. From presidential suites and the halls of Parliaments to police stations in remote corners of the world, this report focuses anti-trafficking work in 187 countries on the pivotal principles of prevention of trafficking, prosecution of the traffickers, and protection of the victims. Each year the trafficking office at the Department of State evaluates whether a government of a country is fully compliant with the minimum standards for the elimination of human trafficking prescribed by the TVPA [Trafficking Victims Protection Act] or, if not, whether the government is making significant efforts to do so. The record is laid bare for the world to see and summarized in a tier rankings narrative. Tier 1 countries fully meet the minimum standards. Tier 2 do not meet the minimum standards, but are making significant efforts to do so. Tier 3 countries do not meet the standards and are not making significant efforts to do so, and indeed, may be subject to sanctions. Over the last 14 years more than 100 countries have enacted anti-trafficking laws, and many countries have taken other steps required to significantly raise their tier rankings. Some countries openly credit the TIP Report for their increased and effective anti-trafficking response--kind of look at it as a mirror and look to us for examples of how to do even better." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Mark Lagon, Shay Cullen, Matthew Smith, and Jesse Eaves.

Report Number:
Serial No. 114-64
Publisher:
Date:
2015
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
House Committee on Foreign Affairs: https://foreignaffairs.house.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
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