ABSTRACT

Advancing Commercial Weather Data: Collaborative Efforts to Improve Forecasts, Part II: Hearing Before the Committee on Science Space, and Technology, Subcommittee on Environment, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, First Session, July 14, 2015   [open pdf - 666KB]

Alternate Title: Advancing Commercial Weather Data: Collaborative Efforts to Improve Forecasts, Part 2: Hearing Before the Committee on Science Space, and Technology, Subcommittee on Environment, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, First Session, July 14, 2015

This is a testimony compilation of the July 14, 2015 hearing "Advancing Commercial Weather Data: Collaborative Efforts to Improve Forecasts, Part II" (use the following URL to view Part I of the hearing: https://www.hsdl.org/?abstract&did=791112), held before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. From the opening statement of subcommittee chairman Jim Bridenstine: "I am pleased to have NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] here today to continue the discussion of weather data and how a system that integrates multiple data sources will look in the future as NOAA evolves with the weather enterprise. I hope we can have a productive conversation today to help inform Congress on the policies and laws in place that guide our data sharing practices. It is my understanding that NOAA adheres to the principles of World Meteorological Organization's Resolution 40, which states that environmental weather data is publically shared internationally. While I agree with the intention of this policy, it could also have negative effects on the very people NOAA is trying to help. It could prevent markets from forming, thwart innovation, reduce the quantity of data available, perpetuate the existing government monopoly and cause costs to balloon. In short, this policy could work against our ability to predict timely and accurate weather events. If our policy requires a product to be given away free of charge, only the government will produce the product. In May, we learned that there are a few situations where NOAA applies a slightly different policy with success. NOAA contracts with some private entities and the nature of those contracts prohibits NOAA from giving the data away for free." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Manson Brown.

Publisher:
Date:
2015-07-14
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: https://science.house.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
Help with citations