ABSTRACT

Intelligence Community: Keeping Watch Over Its Contractor Workforce, Hearing Before U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs, One Hundred and Thirteenth Congress, Second Session, June 18, 2014   [open pdf - 741KB]

This testimony compilation is from the June 18, 2014 hearing before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, "The Intelligence Community: Keeping Watch Over Its Contractor Workers." From the opening statement of Thomas R. Carper: "While the precise number of employees at each intelligence agency is classified, it is no secret that following 9/11, the intelligence community ramped up its workforce, including its use of contractors. In response to concerns that the intelligence community had become too reliant on contractors, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence began in 2006 to conduct an annual inventory of contractors performing 'core' functions at the heart of intelligence operations. The goal of this inventory is to provide a snapshot of the size of the intelligence contractor workforce, its costs, the functions it performs, and the reasons cited by agencies for using the contractors. This hearing will focus on a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report requested by our former colleague, Senator Daniel Akaka, with support from myself and Senators Coburn, Collins, McCaskill and Johnson. We asked GAO to look closely at the annual inventory of core contractors and find out how well it's really working in helping agencies better know and manage their workforce. […] While the GAO's report shows a number of problems, I like to say that in adversity, lies opportunity. If the intelligence community can get past its initial learning curve in conducting these inventories, it will have what is potentially a very useful tool that can be used to help make better decisions about its entire workforce. These inventories could help the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the individual intelligence agencies identify where their critical skill gaps are. The inventories could also help identify where the government is paying too much for contractors, or where agencies could save money through strategic sourcing." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Thomas R. Carper, Tom Coburn, Stephanie O'Sullivan, and Timothy J. DiNapoli.

Publisher:
Date:
2014-06-18
Copyright:
Public Domain
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U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs: http://www.hsgac.senate.gov/
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pdf
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application/x-shockwave-flash; application/pdf
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