ABSTRACT

Securing Radiological Materials: Examining the Threat Next Door, Hearing Before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session, June 12, 2014   [open pdf - 464KB]

This is testimony from the June 12, 2014 hearing on "Securing Radiological Materials: Examining the Threat Next Door" held before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. From the opening statement of Thomas R. Carper: "The tragic events of the 117th Boston Marathon remind us that we must constantly seek to counter the threats from homegrown terrorists and to improve our nation's ability to anticipate - and prevent - the next attack. A dirty bomb is any kind of crude explosive device that, when detonated, disperses radiation around and beyond the blast. If a dirty bomb successfully goes off, those who survive the blast can be exposed to harmful amounts of radiation that could cause sickness or even death. Moreover, a dirty bomb could render areas uninhabitable for many years, making it a highly disruptive weapon. If the Boston Marathon terrorists had turned their pressure-cooker bombs into dirty bombs, then the consequences of that tragic day could have multiplied by an order of magnitude. [...] Today's hearing will focus on how we can ensure that this hypothetical situation never comes to pass. We will focus on the threat of a dirty bomb and specifically examine the security of radiological material here in communities across the country that can be used in a dirty bomb." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Anne Harrington, Huban A. Gowadia, Mark Satorius, and David Trimble.

Publisher:
Date:
2014-06-12
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs: http://www.hsgac.senate.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
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