ABSTRACT

21st Century Strategies for Policing Protest: What Major Cities' Responses to the Occupy Movement Tell Us About the Future of Police Response to Public Protest   [open pdf - 2MB]

From the thesis abstract: "The study of a law enforcement response to a national movement is a homeland security issue. How America polices its population establishes the benchmark for how it treats the world and is worthy of exploration. What can the experiences of four major U.S. cities, in their response to the Occupy Movement, tell us about using emergent strategies for policing protest in the twenty-first century? In the fall of 2011, the Occupy Movement protests swept across the United States in a matter of weeks. Activists demonstrated against income inequality and the state of the economy, and they established camps in major urban areas, occupying public spaces. I conducted case studies of New York City; Oakland, California; Portland, Oregon; and Dallas, Texas, and analyzed the results. That analysis revealed common themes, including a lack of negotiated management, restricting access to traditionally open public spaces by the police and the use of emergent practice in the complex adaptive environment of demonstrations. From this analysis, I am able to provide strategic recommendations for city and police leaders in dealing with protests in the twenty-first century utilizing a sense-making framework that will assist leaders in strategic planning for protests for large and small cities alike."

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2014-03
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Naval Postgraduate School, Dudley Knox Library: http://www.nps.edu/Library/index.aspx
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Cohort CA1205/1206
URL:
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