ABSTRACT

Presidential Authority to Decline to Execute Unconstitutional Statutes: Memorandum for the Honorable Abner J. Mikva, Counsel to the President [November 2, 1994]   [open pdf - 43KB]

"First, there is significant judicial approval of this proposition. Most notable is the Court's decision in Myers v. United States, 272 U.S. 52 (1926). There the Court sustained the President's view that the statute at issue was unconstitutional without any member of the Court suggesting that the President had acted improperly in refusing to abide by the statute. More recently, in Freytag v. Commissioner, 501 U.S. 868 (1991), all four of the Justices who addressed the issue agreed that the President has 'the power to veto encroaching laws . . . or even to disregard them when they are unconstitutional.' Id. at 906 (Scalia, J., concurring); […] Second, consistent and substantial executive practice also confirms this general proposition. Opinions dating to at least 1860 assert the President's authority to decline to effectuate enactments that the President views as unconstitutional. See, e.g., Memorial of Captain Meigs, 9 Op. Att'y Gen. 462, 469-70 (1860) (asserting that the President need not enforce a statute purporting to appoint an officer); see also annotations of attached Attorney General and Office of Legal Counsel opinions. Moreover, as we discuss more fully below, numerous Presidents have provided advance notice of their intention not to enforce specific statutory requirements that they have viewed as unconstitutional, and the Supreme Court has implicitly endorsed this practice. See INS [Immigration and Naturalization Service] v. Chadha, 462 U.S. 919, 942 n.13 (1983) (noting that Presidents often sign legislation containing constitutionally objectionable provisions and indicate that they will not comply with those provisions)."

Publisher:
Date:
1994-11-02
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
United States. Department of Justice: http://www.justice.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
Help with citations