ABSTRACT

Legal Rights of Guantánamo Detainees: What are They, Should They Be Changed, and Is an End in Sight? Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology and Homeland Security of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Tenth Congress, First Session, December 11, 2007   [open pdf - 10MB]

This is the December 11, 2007 hearing on "The Legal Rights of Guantánamo Detainees: What are They, Should They Be Changed, and Is an End in Sight?," held before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology and Homeland Security. From the opening statement of Dianne Feinstein: "Thirteen hundred miles south of Washington, in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the United States has built a detention facility to hold and interrogate suspected terrorists and other enemy combatants. Detainees were brought to Guantánamo beginning in January of 2002. Seven hundred and fifty-nine detainees have been held there. About 454 have been released or have died, four from apparent suicides. As of last week, 305 detainees remain. Of those, we understand approximately 60 to 80 have been cleared for release, but are still being held because of difficulties of sending them elsewhere. Only four detainees have been formally charged and it is reported that the Defense Department plans to prosecute another 60 to 80 detainees. The administration has repeatedly called those individuals at Guantánamo 'the worst of the worst,' and there are bad people there." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Benjamin L. Cardin, Richard J. Durbin, Russell D. Feingold, Dianne Feinstein, John Kyl, Patrick J. Leahy, Debra Burlingame, Mark Denbeaux, Steven Engel, Thomas W. Hartmann, and John D. Hutson.

Report Number:
S. Hrg. 110-900; Senate Hearing 110-900; Serial No. J-110-66
Publisher:
Date:
2009
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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