ABSTRACT

Security Cooperation, Security Assistance, and Building Partner Capacity: Enhancing Interagency Collaboration   [open pdf - 1MB]

"Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the Executive Branch determined gaps existed with the traditional Security Assistance authorities, which hindered the United States' ability to address certain counterterrorism and stability operations funding, capacity and capability shortfalls of key partner nations. […] From the outset of their enactment, Security Cooperation programs, epitomized by Section 1206, generated substantial controversy within Congress, the Executive Branch, and various foreign relations and armed services academia. Despite notable counterterrorism successes in Yemen, Pakistan, Trans-Sahara Africa, and the Philippines- Malaysia-Indonesia tri-border region, Section 1206 and dual-key have become a source of friction between DoD and DoS [Department of State] within the overall debate over the 'militarization of foreign policy.' Even with the rigorous debate that Section 1206 and dual-key mechanisms have generated with regards to roles and missions between DoD and DoS, this essay will seek to demonstrate they have produced substantial benefits to the advancement of U.S. National Security Policy."

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2011-04-01
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC): http://www.dtic.mil/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Joint Forces Quarterly (2nd Quarter, 2011), no. 61
URL:
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