ABSTRACT

DHS Information Technology: How Effectively Has DHS Harnessed It to Secure Our Borders and Uphold Immigration Laws? Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, First Session, March 19, 2013   [open pdf - 378KB]

This is the hearing entitled "DHS Information Technology: How Effectively Has DHS Harnessed It to Secure Our Borders and Uphold Immigration Laws?" before the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Homeland Security, Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency on March 19, 2013. From the opening statement of Jeff Duncan: "The component agencies that make up the Department of Homeland Security rely heavily on information technology (IT) to perform a wide range of missions. IT is especially important with regard to border security and immigration enforcement. With one of the federal government's largest information technology budgets, DHS's component agencies such as Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) rely on critical IT systems in their daily operations to protect the nation's borders, prevent terrorists from entering the U.S., and facilitate the legitimate flow of people and trade into and out of our country. […] In fiscal year 2012, the Department of Homeland Security planned to spend nearly $5.6 billion in IT investments, $1.7 billion of which is for programs the Department considers to be major investments in CBP, ICE and USCIS. […] Despite some successes by the Department in data center and network consolidation, as well as cloud-based service offerings and establishing IT Centers of Excellence, GAO and the DHS Inspector General have identified numerous cases where the Department has yet to reduce costs and duplication through technology-based integration and modernization. GAO [Government Accountability Office] reported in September 2012 that of DHS's 68 major IT investments, roughly one-third had not fully met their cost or schedule targets. These delays could mean border agents will have to make do with legacy IT systems for longer." Statements, letters and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Jeff Duncan, Ron Barber, Margie Graves, David Powner, Richard Hudson, Beto O'Rourke, and Charles K. Edwards.

Report Number:
Serial No. 113-7
Publisher:
Date:
2013
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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