ABSTRACT

President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR): Funding Issues After a Decade of Implementation, FY2004-FY2013 [October 10, 2012]   [open pdf - 466KB]

"The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is the largest bilateral health initiative in the world. The 2003 pledge of President George W. Bush to spend $15 billion over five years on fighting HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria was considered groundbreaking. The initiative challenged the international community to reject claims that large-scale HIV/AIDS treatment plans could not be carried out in low-resource settings. In December 2002, one month before PEPFAR was announced, only 50,000 people of the estimated 4 million requiring antiretroviral (ARV) medicines in sub-Saharan Africa were receiving treatment. By the end of FY2004, 155,000 people were receiving treatment through PEPFAR. […] This report outlines U.S. spending on global HIV/AIDS programs since the inception of PEPFAR, analyzes global HIV/AIDS funding by other donors, and highlights key issues pertaining to funding that will face the 113th Congress as it considers the future of PEPFAR, including [1] whether to reauthorize funding for PEPFAR following the expiration of the Lantos-Hyde Act in FY2013; [2] engagement with emerging economies and other non-traditional donors who are increasing their participation in the global fight against HIV/AIDS; [3] the impact of U.S. efforts to transition ownership of national HIV/AIDS plans to recipient countries; [4] the appropriate funding level for the Global Fund; [5] whether to support innovative fund-raising approaches for global HIV/AIDS programs, such as taxes on financial transactions and income; and [6] developments that might increase HIV/AIDS treatment costs, including intellectual property rights and drug resistance. Program implementation and authorization issues will be addressed more extensively in future related reports."

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, R42776
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2012-10-10
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Department of State, Foreign Press Centers: http://fpc.state.gov/
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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