ABSTRACT

Tribal Law and Order Act One Year Later: Have We Improved Public Safety and Justice Throughout Indian Country? Hearing Before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, First Session, September 22, 2011   [open pdf - 474KB]

From the opening statement of Daniel K. Akaka: "Aloha and welcome to the Committee's oversight hearing on the Tribal Law and Order Act One Year Later: Have We Improved Public Safety and Justice Throughout Indian Country? Today, our Native communities face severe and disproportionate threats to their public safety. Nationwide Indian reservations suffer from a violent crime rate of more than two-and-a-half times the national average. And with some reservations facing a violent crime rate as high as 20 times the national average. And women in our communities are especially vulnerable to violence. More than one in three Native women will be raped in their lifetime and two in five will fall victim to domestic or partner violence. These grave statistics are the result of a complicated jurisdictional maze that often allows severe crimes to go unpunished in Native communities. Native justice systems are also extremely underfunded and lack adequate data, training and coordination with State and Federal agencies to deal with the problem." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Daniel K. Akaka, Tim Johnson, Jon Tester, John Thune, Larry Echo Hawk, Troy A. Eid, Pamela S. Hyde, Brendan V. Johnson, Jackqueline Johnson-Pata, Thomas J. Perrelli, Ivan D. Posey, Theresa M. Pouley, Rose L. Weahkee.

Report Number:
S. Hrg. 112; Senate Hearing 112-434
Publisher:
Date:
2012
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Government Printing Office, Federal Digital System: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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