ABSTRACT

U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa and the African Growth and Opportunity Act [August 2, 2012]   [open pdf - 535KB]

"A key element in U.S. policy toward Africa is the potential benefit from increased trade and commercial ties between the United States and Africa. Interest in increasing bilateral commerce began after the end of the apartheid era in South Africa in the early 1990s. In 1993, Congress approved the end of anti-apartheid restrictions, and later that year then-Commerce Secretary Ron Brown led a business delegation to South Africa. In subsequent years, the Administration has also instituted several measures to help sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries and increase U.S. trade and investment in the region. […] One of these provisions, which permits imports of apparel made in designated lesser-developed SSA countries of third-country yarns and fabrics (meaning that the yarns and fabrics may come from any country), subject to a cap, expires on September 30, 2012. This report examines African economic trends and U.S. trade and investment flows with SSA. It discusses the provisions of AGOA [African Growth and Opportunity Act] and the changes that have occurred since its enactment. It concludes with a brief discussion of issues for Congress."

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, RL31772
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2012-08-02
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Via E-mail
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
Help with citations