ABSTRACT

U.S.- Japan Security Alliance: Will it Survive in the New World Order?   [open pdf - 5MB]

From the thesis abstract: "When George Bush took office in January 1989, he spoke of a new world order. The characteristics of this new world order may be more physical than the ideological Cold War. Some characteristics are emerging--resurfacing of old rivalries, greater interdependence between major powers, more weapons of mass destruction, information revolution, and the ascendancy of economic power over military power to name a few. These changes mandate a review of old alliances designed to implement a national security strategy or containment. One candidate is the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security between the United States and Japan commonly referred to as the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance. Now that the Cold War is over, is this treaty still relevant? Given Japan's economic miracle, should the United States continue to provide Japan's national security and protect Japan's vital interests? This paper examines the treaty from three perspectives: -Is the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance still relevant in the emerging world order from a military perspective?"

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
1991-04-01
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Defense Technical Information Center: http://dsearch.dtic.mil/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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