ABSTRACT

Federal Efforts to Protect Public Health by Reducing Diesel Emissions, Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, First Session, May 12, 2011   [open pdf - 4MB]

This is the May 12, 2011 hearing on "Federal Efforts to Protect Public Health by Reducing Diesel Emissions," held before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety of the Committee on Environment and Public Works. From the opening statement of Thomas R. Carper: "Cleaning up dirty diesel emissions provides us an opportunity to work across the aisle, something we do too rarely these days. Our nation relies heavily on diesel power to transport commuters, harvest our crops, and build our infrastructure. The good thing about diesel engines is that they last a long time, and the bad thing about diesel engines is that they last a long time. Clean diesel engines made today are reaching near zero emissions, but that does nothing for the millions of engines already in use and will be in use for the next 20 years. Despite new engine standards, the EPA estimates there are 11 million diesel engines in America lacking the latest pollution control technology." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Robert O'Keefe, Todd Parfitt, Robert Lanham, Allen R. Schaeffer, and Conrad G. Schneider.

Report Number:
S. Hrg. 112-919; Senate Hearing 112-919
Publisher:
Date:
2015
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Government Publishing Office: http://www.gpo.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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