ABSTRACT

Message Not Yet Sent: Using Strategic Communications to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction Threats   [open pdf - 668KB]

"The invasion and occupation of Iraq was a strong message sent by the United States to the world. The message was this: 'We can take down your country for just about any reason we want to. And if you purport to have weapons of mass destruction, that's a pretty good reason.' […] The United States turned heads with its message of willingness to use force, but failed utterly in communicating the righteousness of the cause. […] What was missing was a coherent strategic communications campaign for the United States - a campaign that needed to be in place long before any invasion. […] The Department of Homeland Security is at full speed trying to avoid a WMD calamity within our borders, and recently established an operating Domestic Nuclear Detection Office to team with other agencies within the government to look for nuclear weapons. […] The strategic communications effort is lagging the fight to combat WMD, both in developed plans and intensity, but many expect the pace to quicken in the communications arena in coming months. As it does, any new strategic communications campaign for the United States should include thoughtful consideration for employing this little-used tool to combat WMD as well. To be effective, such an effort may require years, not days or months - and the United States should have started long ago. But like investing, the second best time to start is now."

Report Number:
Counterproliferation Papers, Future Warfare Series No. 35
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2006-07
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
USAF Counterproliferation Center: http://cpc.au.af.mil/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Counterproliferation Papers, Future Warfare Series No. 35
URL:
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