ABSTRACT

Pakistan-U.S. Relations [Updated February 2, 2007]   [open pdf - 341KB]

"Pakistan's macroeconomic indicators have turned positive since 2001 and some meaningful poverty reduction has been seen in this still poor country. President Bush seeks to expand U.S.-Pakistan trade and investment relations. Democracy has fared poorly in Pakistan; the country has endured direct military rule for more than half of its existence. In 1999, the elected government was ousted in a coup led by Army Chief General Pervez Musharraf, who later assumed the title of president. Supreme Court-ordered elections in 2002 seated a new civilian government (Musharraf ally Shaukat Aziz serves as prime minister), but it remains weak, and Musharraf has retained his position as army chief. The United States urges restoration of democracy and expects Pakistan's planned 2007 general elections to be free and fair. Congress has annually granted one-year presidential authority to waive coup-related aid sanctions. Pakistan is among the world's leading recipients of U.S. aid, obtaining more than $3.5 billion in direct U.S. assistance for FY2002-FY2006, including $1.5 billion in security-related aid. Pakistan also has received billions of dollars in reimbursement for its support of U.S.-led counterterrorism operations."

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, RL33498
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Publisher:
Date:
2007-02-02
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
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pdf
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application/pdf
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