ABSTRACT

Future of US Airpower on the Korean Peninsula   [open pdf - 54KB]

"Since the summer of 1950, US airpower has remained one of the dominant military forces on the Korean Peninsula. Through the Korean War, the Cold War, the uncertain post-Cold War era that has existed since the fall of the Soviet Union, and the transition of power in North Korea from Kim Il Sung to his son, Kim Jong Il, the ability of US airpower to serve as a key pillar of deterrence to forces that threaten the stability and security of the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the ROK-US alliance has remained unquestioned. In a transforming geopolitical landscape and a rapidly evolving region, this is unlikely to change in the future. Many issues relating to the disposition of US forces in Asia - Korea in particular - are relevant to any discussion regarding the future of air forces on the peninsula and surrounding areas that would find themselves involved in a conflict or major military operation during a crisis. Among the most important of these is the evolving North Korean threat. This article analyzes that threat and its development over the past decade."

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2005-09-01
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Air and Space Power Chronicles: http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Air and Space Power Journal (Fall 2005)
URL:
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