ABSTRACT

Czechoslovakia's 'Velvet Divorce,' Visegrad Cohesion, and European Fault Lines   [open pdf - 1MB]

"The separation of the Czech and Slovak Federated Republic (CSfR) into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993 did not just draw a new state boundary at the Moravian-Slovak border. The psychological and regional security implications of the split are much greater: it has caused realignment in Central Europe. New borders have caused the Czech Republic to turn westward, weakening the Visegrad Group and creating the potential for isolating Slovakia with reverberations extending to Ukraine. Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary created the Visegrad triangle on 15 February 1991 to demonstrate the ability of the three to overcome historical differences and to coordinate their eventual 'return to Europe.' This was to be achieved by joining Western institutions such as the European Community (EC) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)."

Report Number:
McNair Paper No. 23
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
1993-10
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC): http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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