ABSTRACT

Conflicting Paradigms, Dissimilar Contexts: Intelligence Reform in Europe's Emerging Democracies   [open pdf - 2MB]

Intelligence reform is a critical element of democratization, but it is frequently relegated to the back burner in the early days of post-authoritarian regime transitions. This is due, in part, to a reflexive aversion to what was commonly the most brutal legacy of the former regimes. Transition populations tend to favor the destruction of intelligence apparatuses, not their reform. In the post-communist transitions in central and Eastern Europe, competing priorities also distracted attention from intelligence reform as political, economic, and other security institutions simultaneously underwent changes. Unfortunately, the West's attempts to evaluate the intelligence reform process in the various states of the region were handicapped by the differences among the new democracies, which limited comparative analysis; by the inappropriateness of western models developed under different political, social, and economic circumstances; and by the failure of western analysts to recognize that the post-Cold War revolution in intelligence affairs conflicts in many respects with the classic model of intelligence reform. This article examines these challenges.

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2004
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Center for the Study of Intelligence, http://www.cia.gov/csi/index.html
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Studies in Intelligence, v.48 no.1, p.11-25
URL:
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