ABSTRACT

SARS among Critical Care Nurses, Toronto   [open pdf - 80KB]

To determine factors that predispose or protect healthcare workers from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), this document examines a study conducted among 43 nurses who worked in two Toronto critical care units with SARS patients. Eight of 32 nurses who entered a SARS patient's room were infected. The probability of SARS infection was 6% per shift worked. Assisting during intubation, suctioning before intubation, and manipulating the oxygen mask were high-risk activities. Consistently wearing a mask (either surgical or particulate respirator type N95) while caring for a SARS patient was protective for the nurses, and consistent use of the N95 mask was more protective than not wearing a mask. Risk was reduced by consistent use of a surgical mask, but not significantly. Risk was lower with consistent use of a N95 mask than with consistent use of a surgical mask. The document concludes that activities related to intubation increase SARS risk and use of a mask (particularly a N95 mask) is protective.

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2004-02
Series:
Copyright:
Public Domain
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Emerging Infectious Diseases (February 2004), v.10, no.2, p. 251-255
URL:
Help with citations