ABSTRACT

Chapter 31: Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B and Related Pyrogenic Toxins   [open pdf - 93KB]

The staphylococcal enterotoxins are a family of superantigen protein toxins produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a toxin often associated with food poisoning, was weaponized as an incapacitating agent by the United States during in the 1960s. When inhaled as a respirable aerosol, SEB causes fever, severe respiratory distress, headache, and sometimes nausea and vomiting. The mechanism of intoxication is thought to be from a massive release of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Diagnosis can be confirmed through the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of tissues or body fluids. Prophylactic administration of an investigational vaccine protects laboratory animals from inhalational challenge. Supportive care is useful in reducing toxicity in unprotected individuals.

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
1997
Copyright:
Public Domain
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Textbook of Military Medicine: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare, p. 621-630
URL:
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