ABSTRACT

Chapter 13: Field Management of Chemical Casualties   [open pdf - 101KB]

Field management of a contaminated casualty or of a casualty in a contaminated environment is cumbersome and manpower-intensive. In front of each medical care facility, from battalion aid station to field hospital, there must be a casualty-receiving station if casualties are contaminated, or if casualties are entering from a contaminated area. In this station, casualties are (a) triaged, (b) given the emergency care that can be provided with both casualty and medical care provider encapsulated in protective garments, (c) decontaminated, and then (d) taken into a noncontaminated--or clean--area for further care. At this stage or after the initial triage, the casualty may be evacuated to a higher-echelon facility, depending on the needs of the casualty and on the resources available. Initial triage is greatly hampered by the partial loss of the senses of sight and touch because of the protective garments. Initial medical care in the contaminated area is rudimentary because of potential contamination on the casualty and because of the protective equipment. Decontamination of a casualty takes about 10 to 20 minutes.

Author:
Publisher:
Date:
1997
Copyright:
Public Domain
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
Source:
Textbook of Military Medicine: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare, p. 325-336
URL:
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