ABSTRACT

Oversight Hearing on the Use of Dispersants in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, Second Session, August 4, 2010   [open pdf - 578KB]

This testimony compilation is from the August 4, 2010 hearing, "Oversight Hearing on the Use of Oil Dispersants in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill," before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. From the opening statement of Committee Chairman Barbara Boxer, "Today we will be examining the issues surrounding the use of chemical dispersants in dealing with the Deepwater spill, which we now know is the largest of its kind in history, totaling an estimated 4.9 million barrels of crude oil - more than 200 million gallons. As of August 3, 2010, the Unified Command reports that BP has used an extraordinary quantity of dispersants in dealing with the Gulf spill -- 1.8 million gallons all together, including 1.1 million gallons applied on the surface and almost 780,000 gallons beneath the surface of the sea. Dispersants work like detergents, breaking up oil into smaller droplets, which may end up suspended in the water column beneath the surface. While this massive application of dispersants was carried out in hopes of protecting the shoreline from oil slicks, it also raises serious questions about short and long term impacts on the environment, and about unintended consequences." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Barbara Boxer, Chairman, U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works; James M. Inhofe, Ranking Member, U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works; John Barrasso, Member, U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works; Paul Anastas, Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency; David Westerholm, Director, Office of Response and Restoration, National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration; Ronald J. Kendall, Director, Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Professor and Chairman, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University; David C. Smith, Professor of Oceanography, Associate Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island; Edward B. Overton, Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University Department of Environmental Science; and Jackie Savitz, Pollution Campaign Director, Senior Scientist, Oceana.

Publisher:
Date:
2010-08-04
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works: http://epw.senate.gov/
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
Help with citations