ABSTRACT

China's Relations with Central Asian States and Problems with Terrorism [December 17, 2001]   [open pdf - 389KB]

Over a number of years, the United States has been actively engaged in efforts to improve human rights conditions in the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the United States Congress, numerous pieces of legislation have been passed that censure, and in many cases impose sanctions against, the PRC for violations of human rights and religious freedoms. However, some analysts suggest that the events of September 11, 2001, may make it more difficult to pressure the Chinese government on human rights and religious freedom violations particularly as they relate to the plight of Uighur Muslims in northwestern Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region (XUAR). Although the Chinese and Central Asian governments have been making claims of this nature for a number of years, it was not until after the events of September 11, 2001 that Western governments seemed interested in learning about the composition of the Uighur resistance movements in Xinjiang and how they operate in and around the Sino-Russian-Central Asian Corridor.

Report Number:
CRS Report for Congress, RL31213
Author:
Publisher:
Date:
2001-12-17
Copyright:
Public Domain
Retrieved From:
Via E-mail
Format:
pdf
Media Type:
application/pdf
URL:
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