ABSTRACT

Challenges at the Border: Examining the Causes, Consequences, and Responses to the Rise in Apprehensions at the Southern Border, Hearing Before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session, July 9, 2014   [open pdf - 535KB]

This hearing is testimony from the July 9, 2014 hearing on "Challenges at the Border: Examining the Causes, Consequences, and Responses to the Rise in Apprehensions at the Southern Border" held before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. From the opening statement of Thomas R. Carper: "Over the past decade, we have made significant progress in securing our borders. Since 2003, for example, we have spent $223 billion dollars to enforce our immigration laws, more than doubling the size of the Border Patrol along the way. We have also built 670 miles of fencing and have deployed force multipliers such as high-tech cameras, radars, and drones up and down the border. In 2006--just eight years ago--the Border Patrol apprehended more than a million people at the border. Last year, we stopped just over 420,000. […] Although overall migration is still at historic lows, we now face a large surge in undocumented immigration from Central America--including unprecedented numbers of unaccompanied children and families showing up at the border. […] Let me be clear: these children and families are not slipping past our borders undetected. They are being apprehended in large numbers by the Border Patrol almost as soon as they touch U.S. soil, often turning themselves in voluntarily. People from Central America, unlike Mexico, must be flown back to their countries. This is a costly process that can take months or even years. This process is even more complicated for unaccompanied children and families, because our laws appropriately require different treatment for these groups. Children must be handed over to the Department of Health and Human Services, and families must be detained in special facilities that include educational opportunities for the children." Statements, letters, and materials submitted for the record include those of the following: Tom Coburn, W. Craig Fugate, R. Gil Kerlikowske, Thomas S. Winkowski, Mark H. Greenberg, Francisco Palmieri, and Juan P. Osuna.

Publisher:United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
Date:2014-07-09
Copyright:Public Domain
Retrieved From:U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs: http://www.hsgac.senate.gov/
Format:pdf
Media Type:application/pdf
URL:https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=756197
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